Battle of Kennesaw Mountain Facts & Summary | American Battlefield Trust
Kennesaw Mountain Battle

Kennesaw Mountain

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In the first days of June, 1864, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman concentrated his armies along the Western and Atlantic Railroad north of Marietta to resupply after a month of heavy fighting. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston positioned his Confederate army defensively between Lost Mountain west of the railroad and Brush Mountain to the east. Sherman moved forward toward Johnston’s position on June 10. After a week of skirmishing at Gilgal Church and along Mud Creek, Johnston pulled back to a new line centered on Kennesaw Mountain, just outside Marietta by June 19. South of Kennesaw, Gen. John B. Hood struck Sherman at Kolb’s Farm on June 22 but was repulsed. Convinced Johnston had stretched his line too thin, Sherman decided on a frontal attack on the Confederate mountain bastion. After an artillery bombardment, Sherman sent his troops forward the morning of June 27. Determined Yankee assaults reached the Rebel trenches, but were unable to break the Southern line. Sherman called the battle as "the hardest fight of the campaign up to that date.” The tactical Confederate victory failed to deliver a strategic win, namely a halt to Sherman's advance towards Atlanta.

Battle Facts

Result

Confederate Victory
COMMANDERS
Forces Engaged
150,000

Union

100,000

Confederate

50,000
Total Estimated Casualties
4,000

Union

3,000

Confederate

1,000