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Eutaw Springs

Saturday & Sunday Tours

Donor Thank You Weekend registration includes Saturday and Sunday tours.
American Battlefield Trust Event
February 11 - 13, 2022

Saturday, February 12, 2022

Gateway to the Backcountry: Camden and the American Revolution

Once the domain of the Catawba Nation, the village of Camden grew up near the banks of the Wateree River. The early years of the American Revolution spared the settlement until the British turned their sights toward South Carolina. Following the fall of Charleston in May 1780 the British army established outposts through the state to pacify resistance to the Crown. Camden soon became a critical British garrison from 1780 to 1781. Camden's inhabitants underwent occupation and witnessed two major battles that forever altered the community.

Join historian Rick Wise for an exploration of historic Camden. Hear the stores of Johan de Kalb, Lord Cornwallis, Andrew Jackson and Nathanael Greene as you relive the American Revolution through the lens of one of the oldest towns in South Carolina.

"The Enemy Were Staggered in All Quarters": The Battle of Hobkirk Hill

After the Battle of Guilford Courthouse in March, 1781, Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene, the commander of the Southern Department, decided to launch a campaign into South Carolina. Greene targeted the numerous British garrisons throughout the state, including Camden. Finding the outpost heavily fortified by Lord Francis Rawdon, Greene assumed a position to the north on Hobkirk Hill. Ever aggressive, Rawdon marched out of Camden on April 25 to attack Greene. Surprisingly, the British victory that followed ultimately turned into a defeat.

Join historian Rick Wise for an exploration of the Battle of Hobkirk Hill. Learn about the stories surrounding the bravery, sacrifice and scapegoating, in this first engagement in Nathanael Greene's campaign to reconquer South Carolina.

Twin Victories in the Cause for Independence: The Battles of Musgrove’s Mill and Blackstocks 

On August 19, 1780, a combined group of around 200 South Carolina, Georgia, and Overmountain Man militia defeated a British detachment of around 500 Provincials and Tory militia. This surprising Patriot victory came just three days after the disastrous Patriot defeat at Camden and one day after another Patriot defeat at Fishing Creek. However, news of the victory at Musgrove Mill would give a much-needed boost to the plummeting moral of the Backcountry Patriots. Captain Samuel Hammond wrote after the war about just how important this victory was to the people of the Backcountry: “The result of this little affair was a clear speck in the horizon, which would have been otherwise very much overcast…it…did much good in the general depression of that period. Our numbers continued to increase from that time, and all seemed to have more confidence in themselves.” A little over two months later, on November 20, 1780 General Thomas Sumter and his army of South Carolina and Georgia militia handed Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton his first defeat during the war. Sumter and his men were able to defeat Tarleton’s better trained soldiers of the 63rd Regiment and British Legion Dragoons by using the defensive advantages of the buildings and fences along the steep ridge line and hills of the farm of William Blackstock on the banks of the Tyger River.

Join historian John Allison for an exploration of Musgrove's Mill and Blackstocks. Hear tales of courage from soldiers and civilians on both sides and learn about the critical and lasting impact these engagements had on the outcome of the American Revolution in South Carolina.

“As Strong a Little Post As Could Be Made”: The Siege of Fort Watson

In the spring of 1781 following the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene’s Continental Army set out to drive the British from South Carolina. Greene focused his efforts on the British garrisons scattered throughout the state. Two of Greene’s most capable subordinates, Lt. Col. Henry “Light Horse Harry” Lee and Brig. Gen. Francis Marion, the “Swamp Fox” moved on Fort Watson. Built atop a Santee Indian mound, this outpost presented a formidable challenge. Undeterred, Lee and Marion relied on ingenuity and innovation during the siege to achieve victory.

Join historian David Reuwer for an exploration of the Siege of Fort Watson. Examine the remains of the mound and hear the stories of valor from this critical phase of the Continental effort to drive the British from South Carolina. 

"Nothing Could Exceed the Gallantry": The Battle of Eutaw Springs

Near the end of August 1781, Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene left his camp in the High Hills of the Santee. Spoiling for a fight, Greene set out in search of a British force led by Lt. Col. Alexander Stewart. After weeks of marching and maneuvering, the two sides collided at Eutaw Springs on September 8. Greene launched a fierce assault that sent Stewart reeling. On the cusp of defeat, the elite troops of the British force made a desperate stand, allowing Stewart to rally and launch a counterattack. Greene abandoned the field and withdrew while both commanders claimed victory.

Join the Trust's Education Manager, Dan Davis, for an exploration of one of the most brutal engagements of the American Revolution. Walk the ground, learn about the archeology that helped identify the battlefield and relive the stories of bravery from both sides in one of the closing engagements for South Carolina.

Sunday, February 13, 2022

Gateway to the Backcountry: Camden and the American Revolution

Once the domain of the Catawba Nation, the village of Camden grew up near the banks of the Wateree River. The early years of the American Revolution spared the settlement until the British turned their sights toward South Carolina. Following the fall of Charleston in May 1780 the British army established outposts through the state to pacify resistance to the Crown. Camden soon became a critical British garrison from 1780 to 1781. Camden's inhabitants underwent occupation and witnessed two major battles that forever altered the community.

Join historian Rick Wise for an exploration of historic Camden. Hear the stores of Johan de Kalb, Lord Cornwallis, Andrew Jackson and Nathanael Greene as you relive the American Revolution through the lens of one of the oldest towns in South Carolina.

Sherman Strikes North: The Battle of Congaree Creek 

Following his famous “March to the Sea” in the fall of Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman’s army group enjoyed a brief respite in Savannah. In early February, Sherman struck north into the heart of South Carolina. Sherman set his sights on the capital at Columbia. Reaching the outskirts of the city, Sherman encountered Confederate cavalry under the skilled and aggressive Lt. Gen. Wade Hampton along Congaree Creek. The Union troops surged forward and eventually flanked the Confederate position, forcing them to withdraw and opening the way to Columbia.

Join historian Dean Hunt for an exploration of this forgotten chapter in Sherman’s Carolinas Campaign. Walk the ground of this relatively untouched site, learn about the battle’s archeology and hear the stories of men on both sides who fought in one of the last engagements of the Civil War.

Lecture - "We Fight, Get Beat, Rise and Fight Again": Nathanael Greene and the Reconquest of South Carolina

By December 1780, Continental efforts in the South lay in tatters. Diasters at Charleston, Waxhaws and Camden opened the door for the British army under Charles, Lord Cornwallis to carry the war into North Carolina. The new American commander, Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene, faced a massive task of rebuilding an army and stopping Cornwallis. In just three, Greene executed a strategy that swung momentum to the Continentals and forced Cornwallis to shift his operations to Virginia. Rather than pursue, Greene set out to drive the British from South Carolina once and for all.

Join Dan Davis, the Trust’s Education Manager, for an exploration of this closing chapter in the American Revolution. We will discuss the Battle of Hobkirk’s Hill, the Siege of Ninety Six and the Battle of Eutaw Springs, among others as we trace Greene’s campaign to free South Carolina from British control and secure Independence.