Annual Conference 2019 Lexington Hero
Christopher A. Kierkus

Conference Tours

Annual Conference: May 29–June 2, 2019

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Tour Descriptions

Wednesday, May 29 - Optional Early Bird:

Kentucky Bourbon Tour

Kentucky is known for its bluegrass, horses, and bourbon. Join us for an inside look at some of the most famous bourbon distilleries in the state, where you will even get a chance to taste their offerings. This will two vartions offered: The first tour will run from 11:00 am - 4:00 pm and will include lunch. The second tour will be from 1:00 - 4:00 pm and will not include lunch. More information on tour pricing and distillery stops will be available in late April.

  • Guide: To be announced
  • Walking: Light, expect some standing at the distilleries. 
  • Please note: There is an additional fee for this tour (TBD). 

 

Thursday, May 30 - Color Bearer Tours:

A Day at Camp Nelson

Established as a Union supply depot and hospital during the Civil War, Camp Nelson became a recruitment and training center for African American soldiers, and a refugee camp for their wives and children. Join us as we explore the complex story of Camp Nelson as we explore this recent addition to the National Park Service.

  • Guide: National Park Service Staff
  • Walking: Moderate
  • Please note: This tour is exclusive to Color Bearers.  

 

A Tour of Lexington Cemetery 

Situated on 170 acres, and established in 1849, Lexington Cemetery is the final resting place of 64,000 souls. Numerous Civil War-era personalities are listed among the cemetery rolls—including Henry Clay, John Breckenridge, and John Hunt Morgan. 

Two tour times will be offered this morning. One at 8:15 am. and one at 10:15 am. These are the same tour, just at different times. 

  • Guide: Kent Masterson Brown 
  • Walking: Moderate, but expect long periods of standing.
  • Please note: This tour is exclusive to Color Bearers.  

 

Friday, May 31:

Beyond the Battlefields–Berea 

Berea, Kentucky, is known for its arts, crafts, and education. Come and explore Berea College—the first coeducational and non-segregated college in the South—as well as the Kentucky Artisan Center, and the Artisan Village District. Enjoy a day of southern arts and hospitality in a picturesque setting. 

  • Guide: To be announced
  • Walking: Moderate 

 

John Hunt Morgan and his Great Raids in Kentucky—Part 1

Part one of this tour will follow Morgan on his First Kentucky Raid in June – July 1862 through Versailles, Midway, and on to Cynthiana, Kentucky where he destroyed the railhead of the Kentucky Central Railroad in advance of Bragg’s invasion of Kentucky.  We will then travel to Augusta, Kentucky, where on September 27, 1862, Colonel Basil W. Duke’s Second Kentucky Cavalry became engaged in a vicious battle with the Union Home Guard in the streets of Augusta during the Confederate invasion of Kentucky.  The tour will end at the Henry Clay Estate in Lexington where Morgan defeated two battalions of Ohio Cavalry on October 18, 1862, as Bragg’s army retreated out of Kentucky.

  • Guide: Kent Masterson Brown 
  • Walking: Light 

 

John H. Morgan, the Battles of Cynthiana, and the Rise and Fall of a Rebel Raider  

This tour will include an easy paced walking tour of the First Battle of Cynthiana, one of John H. Morgan's high points, and following lunch a bus tour of the Second Battle of Cynthiana, one of his worst moments.  We'll discuss the personalities and decisions of both encounters while enjoying a small town atmosphere.  

  • Guide: Darryl Smith 
  • Walking: Moderate 

 

My Footsteps Have Often Been Marked With Blood: Daniel Boone and the American Revolution in Kentucky

No one is more closely associated with the early frontier than Daniel Boone. Boone’s ventures beyond the Allegheny Mountains established him as one of the preeminent long hunters of his day. Although well removed from the thirteen colonies, Boone could not help be swept up in the struggle for independence. Beginning in 1777, Native American tribes, supported by British and Loyalist forces, began to launch raids against the settlements in Kentucky, aptly known as the Bloody Ground. Over the next five years, Boone’s actions during the Revolutionary War contributed to his growing fame but at a tremendous personal cost. Join American Battlefield Trust Education Associate Dan Davis for a tour of sites related to Boone’s life during this pivotal time. Visit Fort Boonesborough, the Blue Licks battlefield and other places that made Daniel Boone an American legend.

  • Guide: Daniel Davis
  • Walking: Moderate 

 

Perryville: The Battle for Kentucky

The Kentucky Campaign reached its zenith at the Battle of Perryville on October 8, 1862. Over five hours of fighting, the Confederates failed to force a decision and started a retreat that did not end until their forces were back in Tennessee. Perryville, therefore, can be regarded as the "High Water Mark of the Confederacy in the West." Today the battlefield is preserved in near-pristine condition by Kentucky State Parks. This tour will examine this climactic battle and battlefield in detail.

  • Guide: Chris Kolakowski 
  • Walking: Moderate

 

Tebb’s Bend to Munfordville 

John Hunt Morgan’s 1863 raid was one of the most famous cavalry expeditions of the Civil War.  Morgan’s audacity allowed him to reach all the way to eastern Ohio before his operation came to grief, but earlier his hubris cost him a bloody defeat at the hands of a small Union force near Tebb’s Bend on the Green River.  Our tour of this remarkable little action includes stops at one of the original battlefield homes (now a museum of the battle) and an evocative Confederate cemetery.

The 1862 Kentucky Campaign ended at Perryville, but a few weeks earlier a sharp battle took place near Munfordville, Kentucky and the L&N Railroad Bridge across the Green River.  Our tour includes a walk through the core of the battlefield and includes a visit to a surviving Union fort.  We will also make a quick stop at the local history museum and see the home of Union general Thomas Wood, who shared his divided hometown with Confederate general Simon Buckner.

  • Guide: A. Wilson Greene 
  • Walking: Moderate—Total walking distance on this tour is about 1 mile on paved or grass trails.

 

The Aftermath of the Battle of Perryville

On October 8, 1862, more than 7,500 Union and Confederate soldiers were killed and wounded at the Battle of Perryville. While the troops moved on after the fight, the residents of Perryville and other surrounding communities were left to contend with the dead, sick, dying, and wounded. Bodies lay on the field for days, and every home, church, business, and barn became makeshift field hospitals. Join Stuart W. Sanders, author of Perryville Under Fire: The Aftermath of Kentucky’s Largest Civil War Battle, for a driving tour of the battleground and an engaging discussion about what happened to the soldiers and civilians after the firing stopped. 

  • Guide: Stuart Sanders 
  • Walking: Light 

 

Saturday, June 1:

A Capitol Tour: Frankfort 

Trek the streets and museums of Kentucky's capital, Frankfort. With visits to the Old State Capitol Museum, Old Governor's Mansion, the Kentucky Military History Museum, participants will walk away with a better understanding of Kentucky's contributions to United States history. 

  • Guide: To Be Announced at a Later Date 
  • Walking: Moderate, expect to stand in many of the museums.

 

Camp Nelson and Mill Springs 

Both Camp Nelson and Mill Springs Battlefield have recently become affiliated areas of the National Park system, indicating their significance in Civil War history.  Camp Nelson first served as the staging ground for Ambrose Burnside’s successful 1863 campaign into East Tennessee, but then became one of the country’s largest contraband camps.  Nowhere is the complex story of Kentucky’s wartime relationship with the dying institution of slavery more poignantly told than at this well-interpreted historic site.

Ulysses S. Grant shattered the Confederacy’s Kentucky defense line in early 1862 at Forts Henry and Donelson, but before then George Thomas broke the eastern end of that line at Mill Springs.  The preservation of Mill Springs Battlefield is one of the great success stories of our age, and the site now features a modern visitor center and a multi-stop driving tour including the ground where the most intense fighting unfolded on January 19, 1862.  We will follow the Confederate forces of Felix Zollicoffer as they marched from their camp near the Cumberland River to the heart of the battlefield, where we will walk in the footsteps of the combatants.

  • Guide: A. Wilson Greene 
  • Walking: Moderate—Walking at each site will be a mile or less on grass trails.

 

John Hunt Morgan and his Great Raids in Kentucky—Part 2

Part two of this tour will travel to Tebb’s Bend of the Green River where Morgan fought a bloody engagement against the 25th Michigan Infantry on July 4, 1863, at the beginning of his Great Raid into Indiana and Ohio.  We will then travel to Lebanon, Kentucky to visit the site where Morgan attacked the 20th Kentucky Infantry in the railroad yards on July 5, 1863.  From Lebanon, we will travel to Bardstown and then to Brandenburg, Kentucky on the Ohio River where Morgan’s Division crossed the river into Indiana on its way to within fifty miles of Cleveland, Ohio.  On our return from Brandenburg, we will visit sites where Morgan’s Division destroyed the trestles of the L&N Railroad during the Christmas Raid in December 1862 and January 1863 and fought a rearguard action at the Rolling Fork where Colonel Basil W. Duke was wounded.

  • Guide: Kent Masterson Brown 
  • Walking: Light 

 

Perryville: Batteries, Bottoms, Brigades, and Bluffs

This will be a rigorous hike following the flow of the October 8, 1862, battle over as many of Perryville’s beautiful rolling hills and ridges as possible. From the early advances near Doctor’s Fork to the bloody Open Knob to the sites of widows’ houses and the scenes of the late-day attacks on land Trust members helped to preserve, we’ll cover as much as we can and delve into the attacks and the key personalities that shaped the battle and the Kentucky Heartland Campaign.  

  • Guide: Garry Adelman 
  • Walking: Extensive—Expect 6-7 miles of hiking over hilly and uneven, grassy terrain. 

 

Perryville: The Battle for Kentucky

The Kentucky Campaign reached its zenith at the Battle of Perryville on October 8, 1862. Over five hours of fighting, the Confederates failed to force a decision and started a retreat that did not end until their forces were back in Tennessee. Perryville, therefore, can be regarded as the "High Water Mark of the Confederacy in the West." Today the battlefield is preserved in near-pristine condition by Kentucky State Parks. This tour will examine this climactic battle and battlefield in detail.

  • Guide: Chris Kolakowski
  • Walking: Moderate  

 

Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill

Experience what life would have been like in one of the largest communal societies of the 19th Century. You’ll have the opportunity to visit the Historic Centre on your own and enjoy daily programs and the unique architecture, as well as opportunities to do hands-on learning. Guided tours of the Farm and Garden will be available for those interested. Lunch will be provided.

  • Guide: Trust and Shaker Village staff
  • Walking: Moderate to heavy walking, depending on your interest level. 

 

The Battle of Richmond, Kentucky

Come experience one the most complete victories one side had over the other during the American Civil War:  the Battle of Richmond, Kentucky. Stops will include, but are not limited to, the Battle of Richmond Visitor Center, Pleasant View House and Farm, the historic Mt. Zion Church, which served as both a Union and Confederate hospital during and after the battle.  Due to the nature of the entire battlefield and limited parking areas at some spots, there will be some windshield views. But you can be guaranteed you will have fun and learn in the process.  

  • Guide: Phillip Seyfrit
  • Walking: Light to Moderate 

 

The Solider and the Politician: A Tour of the John Hunt Morgan House and Henry Clay's Ashland 

John Hunt Morgan and Henry Clay are two Kentucky icons of the Civil War era. One earned his reputation by conducting audacious cavalry raids. While the other proved to be one of the most influential, and shrewd, politicians of the 19th century. Join American Battlefield Education Associate Daniel Davis for exploration of these two men and the homes that they created in Kentucky. Please note that this tour will run from 9:30 am to 3:30 pm. 

  • Guide: Daniel Davis 
  • Walking: Light, but expect to stand in the museums.

 

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